The Latest Stem Cells Therapy and Clinical News

Burns received a stem cell transplant on September 9, 2014

Stemming cancer tide

The Standard (20 Sep, 2016)
A FORTNIGHT AGO, Rebecca Hertzog Burns turned two. She says that's her age, though she's really 27. After a relapse in her fight with acute myelogenous leukemia, Burns received a stem cell transplant on September 9, 2014, through an infusion of umbilical cord blood from a baby boy.

Cord-Blood Transplantation in Patients with Minimal Residual Disease

Cord-Blood Transplantation in Patients with Minimal Residual Disease

The NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL of MEDICINE (8 Sep, 2016)
The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center reported that in patients with minimal residual disease, the use of cord blood as the donor source for hematopoietic-cell transplantation led to a higher rate of survival and a lower rate of relapse than the use of a transplant from an HLA-mismatched unrelated donor.
Duke researchers explore potential of umbilical cord blood as a regenerative therapy

Duke researchers explore potential of umbilical cord blood as a regenerative therapy

The Chronicle (1 Aug, 2016)
Researchers such as Dr Joanne Kurtzberg, Professor of Paediatrics and Pathology at Duke University Medical School, has been conducting several clinical trials to investigate whether umbilical cord blood can help to treat a variety of inherited metabolic diseases, blood cancers, cerebral palsy and recently, autism. The possibilities of stem cell applications are limitless and the umbilical cord may one day become an unlimited resource of life-changing cells.

Subcutaneous treatment with cord blood stem cells improves eczema symptoms

Subcutaneous treatment with cord blood stem cells improves eczema symptoms

News-Medical.Net (7 Jun, 2016)
A new study suggests that treatment with stem cells from umbilical cord blood might be an effective therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe eczema, or atopic dermatitis.

Stem cells shown safe, beneficial for chronic stroke patients

Stem cells shown safe, beneficial for chronic stroke patients

Stanford Medicine News Center (2 Jun, 2016)
Injecting modified, human, adult stem cells directly into the brains of chronic stroke patients proved not only safe but effective in restoring motor function, according to the findings of a small clinical trial led by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators.